As if we didn't need more sad news, June Foray has died at 99

Okay, I didn't know who she was either, but it turns out we all do.

June Foray, the voice of “The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show’s” Rocky the Flying Squirrel — and of his nemesis Natasha Fatale of Boris and Natasha fame — in the early 1960s and a key figure in the animation industry, died Thursday. She was 99.
Her close friend Dave Nimitz confirmed her death on Facebook, writing, “With a heavy heart again I want to let you all know that we lost our little June today at 99 years old.”
Foray was also the voice behind Looney Tunes’ Witch Hazel, Nell from “Dudley Do-Right,” Granny in the “Tweety and Sylvester” cartoons and Cindy Lou Who in Chuck Jones’ “How the Grinch Stole Christmas,” among hundreds of others.

Of course, 99 years is a pretty good run.

Not so sure about this price

147 Byram Shore

147 Byram Shore

147 Byram Shore Road is new today, introduced to the market at $5.995 million. Very nice house, and Byram Shore Road has seen some huge sales, but that said, this isn't direct waterfront: shared access via  path only, and New Lebanon School isn't Riverside. If you want to drive to NYC, the location is more convenient than Willowmere Circle, but otherwise, the western side of town isn't really close to anything.

It did sell—to these owners—for $5.375 back in 2005, and a lot of money and effort has been expended on further improvements, but a 2005 price isn't necessarily one that you should base a price opinion on.

But like Willowmere, the market decides these things, not listing agents, owners, and least of all, real estate bloggers.

New listing

33 Willowmere Circle

33 Willowmere Circle

33 Willowmere Circle, waterfront in Riverside, asking $5.450 million. I don't think that's a crazy price at all. Willowmere Circle's one of my (and many others') favorite neighborhoods, and direct waterfront, with dock and a boat ramp, is rare. So good street, great neighborhood and a fully-renovated house.

As I said, not crazy at all. But we'll have to see if the market agrees with me.

Awful, awful tragedy, but there's a lesson here

Toddlers drown

Toddlers drown

 twins drown in pool.

Three-year-old twin boys drowned in their backyard pool Wednesday — after slipping out the back of their Long Island home while their mother was asleep, law enforcement officials said.

Kids don't drown in creeks or ponds, as a general observation. Pools are deadly. I personally wouldn't have a pool if I had children under, say 8, and even then I'd want them to know how to swim. If you must have one, look into one of those pool barriers that is removable, but don't remove it (while the pool is open) until your children are old enough and able enough to survive in water. 

These are such awful tragedies, and it breaks my heart to hear of them, whether they occur in Greenwich or somewhere else. Just don't do it.

This lawyer would have accepted a fool for a client

11 Cove Road (boat and paddle board borrowed from neighbor, left)

11 Cove Road (boat and paddle board borrowed from neighbor, left)

A year ago come August, a spec builder who chose to represent himself as the listing agent put 11 Cove Road, in Lucas Point, Old Greenwich, up for sale at $11.750 million. I, and commenters on this blog, hooted with derision at that price (and once again, I so regret losing my archives, because otherwise we could all revisit that original post and have a hearty laugh), and we were proved right: latest price cut today puts it down to $7.475.

Assuming it finally sells for, say, $6.5 million, that builder would have paid $162,500 to a listing broker and received in return an accurate listing price, someone to absorb advertising costs, and willing to spend endless hours showing the place, all while avoiding the carrying costs of a project that he'd sunk millions into: $3.5 million for the land alone. But no one was going to steal money from this genius!

Not much else to add; we've been picking on this house for a while now, but there is this: a listing note reminds agents that the project received "HOBI Awards for Best Spec House of 2016, and Best Library".

HOBI ("Connecticut Home Builders whatever" is one of those circle-jerk organizations run by a PR firm, JMC Resources, that makes its money from publishing a "builder" magazine: buy an ad, get a profile. The members take turns giving prizes to one another so everyone can tout their phoney, absurd plaques to gullible buyers. My advice: If you like a house, buy it: if you don't, then don't. A HOBI award might just as well be on the roller in the bathroom.

HOBI  award-winning library. you might think a library would have a ceiling, so you could have some quiet while reading a book, if there were any here to read.  If we had ham, we could have ham and eggs, if we had eggs.  

HOBI  award-winning library.

you might think a library would have a ceiling, so you could have some quiet while reading a book, if there were any here to read. 

If we had ham, we could have ham and eggs, if we had eggs.