New listing on Rogues Hill

390 Round Hill.jpg

110 Round Hill Road, roughly approximate to Round Hill Community Church and Mooreland Road, has hit the market at $5.9 million. This 2003 house last sold for $5 million (on an asking price of $7.5) in 2011. Perfectly nice house (designed by Kaali-Nagy, if memory serves, but theses day, memory doesn't always serve); I liked it back in 2010, but scoffed at that first asking price, as did the market.

What's really interesting about this house, to me, is that the owner back when it was sold in 2011 was former Met Bobby Bonilla. He'd long since returned to Puerto Rico by the time it was put up for sale in 2010, but what a great story. Excerpts from the Wikipedia article I've linked to:

From 1992 to 1994, Bonilla was the highest-paid player in the league, earning more than $6 million per year. Since 2011, Bonilla has been paid approximately $1.19 million by the New York Mets each year. The 25 payments come every July 1, which some fans refer to "Bobby Bonilla Day".[2][3] This was part of a deal made when the Mets released Bonilla before the 2000 season while still owing him $5.9 million for the final year of his contract. The deal expires in 2035, at which point Bonilla will have been paid $29.8 million for a season in which he did not even play for the Mets.[4]
In November 1998, the New York Mets reacquired Bonilla from the Los Angeles Dodgers in exchange for Mel Rojas. Again, his level of play did not measure up to expectations and he had numerous clashes with manager Bobby Valentine over lack of playing time. His tenure in New York culminated in an infamous incident during Game Six of the 1999 NLCS where the Mets were eliminated by the Braves in an eleven inning game while Bonilla reportedly sat in the clubhouse playing cards with teammate Rickey Henderson.[17]
After his subpar 1999 season, the Mets released Bonilla, but still owed him $5.9 million. Bonilla and his agent offered the Mets a deal: Bonilla would defer payment for a decade, and the Mets would pay him an annual paycheck of $1.19 million starting in 2011 and ending in 2035, adding up to a total payout of $29.8 million.[18][19] Mets owner Fred Wilpon accepted the deal mostly because he was heavily invested with Ponzi scheme operator Bernie Madoff, and the 10 percent returns he thought he was getting on his investments with Madoff outweighed the eight percent interest the Mets would be paying on Bonilla's initial $5.9 million. As a result, the payout was a subject of inquiry during the Madoff investment scandal.[20]

Nothing more fun than a house with a history.

 Typical use of a typical "wine cellar": Quinine water, ginger ale, and a couple of cases of beer, canned and bottled. Why builders still include these space wasters eludes me

Typical use of a typical "wine cellar": Quinine water, ginger ale, and a couple of cases of beer, canned and bottled. Why builders still include these space wasters eludes me