One thing to understand about short sales: as the buyer, YOU are establishing the market price

 Remuddled 

Remuddled 

Short sales, where the owner walks away with nothing and the bank cuts its losses, are often considered by the buyer as some sort of bargain discount, and they then try to resell it at it's "proper" price. Wrong: if you paid "X" for it, then that's what the market says it's worth — otherwise, someone would have paid more *.

Case in point is 86 Lower Cross Road, a house on 0.6 acre in the R-4 zone, which sold via short sale in December, 2014 for $990,000. The buyers tried to resell it for $1.795 in 2016 and, finding no buyer, eventually dropped it to $1.150 in June, 2017. When even that price failed to produce a buyer, they proceeded to gut the existing  house and build a remodeled one that, to my taste, anyway, fails in every sense, and have placed it up for sale today at $2.288 million.

It's possible that they'll now find a buyer, and if they can get anywhere close to this asking price I'm sure they'll make out, but, had I been asked, I personally would have advised them to cut their losses back in 2017, rather than pour more money into an ill-advised purchase.

 * when you're seated at the poker table and can't figure out who's the chump, YOU'RE the chump

* when you're seated at the poker table and can't figure out who's the chump, YOU'RE the chump