(Another) price cut in the Stanwich elephant graveyard

"The Jewel of Greenwich"

"The Jewel of Greenwich"

398 Stanwich Road, cut to $4.450 million. It sold new for $5.5 million when it was new in 2004, tried for $6.385 in 2008, after improvements, but eventually sold to these owners in 2010 for $5.695. They, in turn, have been attempting to sell it since 2012 (as I recall, the owner was an oil trader, and got transferred back out of the country after he'd just barely settled in). Opening price then was $5.695 and, as we see, today it's down to $4.5. My advice to the relocation company that's saddled with this place is, keep going.

The latest agent's purple prose is pretty entertaining, however, even if the house itself is not:

Welcome to the jewel of Greenwich, a stately Georgian Colonial Manor sprawled across 2 stunning manicured acres, and graced with gorgeous lake views. Upon entering a double-height reception hall of this 9000+ square foot home, and the eye is immediately drawn to the exquisite details that simply radiate sophistication. (She forgot to mention the old graveyard in the front yard: that's always been a bit of a showstopper.)

This is not an entirely terrible house: it's a Jordan Saper creation, which speaks to high quality, but that also means a Saper design, with room dimensions included, and Saper homes haven't held up well in the resale market. Note that 398 Stanwich is located exactly across from the entrance to Rock Maple Road: 75 Rock Maple sold last week for $5.695 million. That's obviously more than 398's current price, but it's just about what 398 was originally priced at.

No contest.

75 Rock maple road

75 Rock maple road

Headline of the day: "Good riddance to the thong! After decades of discomfort, women have finally cracked."

Well I wouldn't wear it, but it'd be fun to watch

Well I wouldn't wear it, but it'd be fun to watch

99% of women say they will no longer wear thongs.

I try, but this is better than I've managed to come up with today. 

. My question for the ladies is, what were you thinking?! Not that we didn't appreciate it.

Oh well, all good things come to their end.

One man of courage

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As hundreds of NFL players denounce "racist" America in London and across America, Patriot's owner sides with players. I just saved $50 a month

Multi-millionaires claim unfair treatment

Multi-millionaires claim unfair treatment

I pay for a minimum cable package costing $50 a month in order to receive Internet service and to watch the New England Patriots play, period. Kraft's defense of his league's new turn from sports to politics inspired this technology-ignorant consumer to look into alternatives and lo, I can apparently purchase a router for $250 which will allow me to keep connected to the Internet. That's a one-time charge, instead of the $600 I'm paying to watch, maybe, 10 football games a year.

No contest.

Tear down the Bush Holly house! The original owner boarded slaves in the attic.

Destined for Zinn's dustbin of history

Destined for Zinn's dustbin of history

If, as the latest craze has it, we remove statues of Jefferson and Washington because they were slave owners, surely Greenwich will want to remove all memories of a local slave owner's house.

For now. our local virtue-signalers are content to let the building stand, as a means of teaching school children that Greenwich was, "as racist as the south", but their sentiments change as quickly as Facebook tweets, so it's entirely likely that they'll be demanding the museum's razing within the year. After all, the NFL owners were denouncing the antics of Colin Kaepernick and his friends as recently as last December, and until July of this year, statues of Confederate generals were considered acceptable, and until August, schools named after Alexander Hamilton, one of the most prominent of tis country's founders, were still within the pale. 

If you're looking for ways to cut your charitable contributions, you need look no farther than the Greenwich Historical Society:

Debra Mecky, executive director of the Greenwich Historical Society, said it is important to tell the history of slavery in the North, and not portray the region solely as the home of abolitionism.
“If we tear down the places where slavery existed in the North, we continue the myth that the North was not complicit in slavery,” she said.
Few structures in Greenwich bear witness to this fact as lucidly as the Bush-Holley House.
As of today, [but as I suggest, check back in in November]  Mecky advocates keeping the house as a teaching tool, so that school children will understand that America was founded on racism; check in in November and see if she hasn't changed her position.
According to the 1790 census, David Bush — one-time owner of the home — had eight slaves, the most at any household in town at the time. As the Greenwich Historical Society has learned more about the museum that sits alongside its headquarters, it has made a concerted effort to recognize the complexity of the former residents’ legacy.
Reconstructed from census records, inventories, manumission documents, the tax list, northern slave narratives, northern probate records and other resources, the slave quarters at the Bush-Holley House contrast with the rest of the family’s colonial rooms, which were boastfully opulent in their time and still seem ornate now. On tours, docents cover the light that flows into a cramped attic space so it is bathed in pitch black, even as the sun shines outside. That is how curators believe the Bush’s slaves lived in the 18th century: in windowless darkness, with only a few blankets to save them from winter’s bite.
Age qualifies almost every item, but something else sticks out even more: According to documents from the Greenwich Historical Society, “the lintry chamber is the only room on the inventory that lists blankets and coverlets without also including a bedstead.” 
The small, wooden nook is a far cry from a boudoir next door that is equipped with a fireplace and a large bed. On a recent tour, a docent mentioned that the mistress of the household, Sarah Bush, would lock all her furniture inside the room so that nearby slaves couldn’t steal.
In 1784, Connecticut introduced its first abolition legislation, which demanded that slave children born after Mar. 1 of that year be freed when they turned 25 years old, as long as they could care for themselves. A new law in 1797 changed the age requirement for freedom to 21 years old, and according to author Jeffrey Bingham Mead, abolitionism gained momentum early on in Greenwich.
When Fanny Bush manumitted Candis, who had been passed down to her in her father David’s will, she freed the last slave in Greenwich. The year was 1825, and Candis was much older than 21. 
Though 1825 was late, by 1800, there were still more than 1,000 slaves in Connecticut, according to Peter P. Hinks, author of “All Men Free and Brethren.” The state did not fully abolish slavery until 1848 — far later than neighboring Massachusetts, which had forbidden the practice by 1783.
Teresa Vega, whose black ancestors owned property in Greenwich one generation after being freed from slavery, argued that it’s a big part of northern history, and one that still has ramifications today.
“To insinuate that somehow people in the North are less racist or less biased, it’s cocokamamy,” Vega said.
Every year, Greenwich students circle through the Bush-Holley House on tours to learn about colonialism, as well as the art colony that thrived in the home a century later. For a few of the kids, the notion of slavery is a new one.
“Some of our youngest visitors may not have heard the word before,” said Mecky.
“Our mission is to tell the whole story of Greenwich’s past, and slavery is a part of that story,” she continued. “The house is a strong vehicle to illustrate Connecticut’s complicity in slavery.”

I'm not advocating the erasure of history, and private non-profits which adhere to the law and don't engage in political activities should be free to conduct themselves as they please, but emphasizing slavery in their showcase house to elementary school children visiting during school hours is straight from the Howard Zinn system of indoctrination. Zinn, a communist whose text book is now used in high school history classes throughout the country, teaches that America's history is nothing more than a continuing series of exploitation and abuse of, in order, Indians, women and blacks, and late-arriving immigrants like the Irish, Poles, Germans and Jews, that the "melting pot" is a myth (despite all evidence to the contrary), and that our involvement in all wars, including World War II, were simply examples of American aggression. Every modern teacher parrots Zinn, and they've been preaching this line since at least 1980. In fact, the movement to denounce America dates back to at least 1965 — I was there. 

My suggestion is to cut off all funding to the Greenwich Historical Society, and let their flagship propaganda machine and, if we're lucky, the entire organization rot into oblivion. 

"Now that we've seen the slave quarters, we'll practice kneeling while I recite the pledge of ALLEGIANCE 

"Now that we've seen the slave quarters, we'll practice kneeling while I recite the pledge of ALLEGIANCE 

RTM membership list

A reader sent me an Excel spread sheet identifying all RTM candidates, broken down by district, but I'm embarrassed to admit that I can't figure out how to incorporate that document into Squarespace. So I've snapped screenshots of each district's list and am publishing them below. Note that "X" before a name means an incumbent, while "PX" denotes a petition candidate. I by no means intend to seem like a misogynist, but do note that the members of Indivisible Greenich/March on Greenwich are almost exclusively female, and all will appear as Petition Candidates. You may want to vote accordingly.

UPDATE, 12: 02 : For some reason, Squarespace is not importing these screenshots in full. They're fine in draft, but are showing up as blackened out when moved from draft to "publish". Usually reloading the picture solves that when it happens but tried it just now, without success. Come back later, and maybe Squarespace will have gotten its act together. 

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From pink sneakers to flag burning, the NFL is determined to drive away its base

The NFL is bullshit on America

The NFL is bullshit on America

Two days go, Trump stated, that he'd like to see an NFL owner, when one of his players knelt during the national anthem say, "get that bastard off the field!' "Wouldn't the be great?" he added.

The NFL owners, and Roger Gooddell, immediately denounced him. Commissioner Goodwill, speaking for the league, released a statement of support for his protesters:

"The NFL and our players are at our best when we help create a sense of unity in our country and our culture," Goodell said. "There is no better example than the amazing response from our clubs and players to the terrible natural disasters we've experienced over the last month. Divisive comments like these demonstrate an unfortunate lack of respect for the NFL, our great game and all of our players, and a failure to understand the overwhelming force for good our clubs and players represent in our communities."

"A sense of unity in our country and our culture,"? WTF? Who introduced racial politics into football games? Trump? No, he was responding to a growing to a growing phenomenon among black players who have been denouncing our country as a racist society whose cops, black and white kill innocent drug dealers. It was those players who, with the acquiescence of the NFL, brought in politics, even before Trump was president. See, e.g., Colin Kaepernick, September 12, 2016. 

When even 8-year-old football players began, surely as instructed, to kneel before their Pee-Wee games to denounce America, Trump decided to say something. It's Trump who is calling for unity in our country; not the NFL.

But it's the hypocrisy and cynicism of the NFL that really galls me. How many pre-game "Honor Our Troops" ceremonies has it held over the decades, with displays of huge American flags, fly-overs, soldiers and players running onto the field together, and rousing speeches by owners of how proud they are to be Americans? As the TV ratings dropped, and their players began making the news, repeatedly, for bashing and beating up their girl friends and wives, this band of billionaires came up with the novel idea of pretending to be concerned abut woman and simultaneously adding to its fan base by insisting their players wear pink ribbons and, now, pink football shoes to show ... something. What a concern for breast cancer has to do with wife beating escapes me, but whatever.

When that display of feigned concern for women didn't bring in more viewers, the NFL, decided to abandon its original fan base and appeal to the political left, as though there's a huge untapped reservoir of would-be football fans among academia and the elite leftists on our coasts. So far, that's not working either: the LA Rams and San Diego Chargers each played seperate games in California last weekend, and combined to produce "embarrassingly low" attendance figures. 

The NFL is desperately trying to have it both ways: appealing to the patriotism of its original redneck fan base while reaching out to liberals who are ashamed of their country. They hope to send two contradictory messages simultaneously  by staging rousing, albeit phony military shows and encouraging anti-American political statements at those same games, I'm betting that oil and water won't mix, and that this isn't going to work. And if, as threatened, entire teams refuse to stand for the national anthem today, I can guarantee that it won't. By the end of the season, the NFL won't even be able to fill the Yale Bowl

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UPDATE: It occurred to me that last week, a team was penalized 15-yards when a player taunted an opponent after scoring a touchdown. So the NFL won't allow its players to taunt one another, but is perfectly okay with those same players tasting America? Says it all, I suppose.

Other than better weather, what's the difference between Puerto Rico and CT?

To be fair, it does look like their roads are better maintained than ours

To be fair, it does look like their roads are better maintained than ours

WSJ: Puerto Rico's Power Woes Are Decades in the Making

I can't find away around the Journal's cash wall (readers?) but here are some excerpts. Sure sounds like Connecticut, and actually, all 50 states.

Puerto Rico—As residents here grapple with power outages across the entire island, the task of turning the lights back on falls to an electrical utility beset by rickety infrastructure, workforce reductions and financial woes so deep it declared a form of bankruptcy in July.
The “damage is catastrophic,” Ricardo Ramos, chief executive of Prepa, said Friday on CNN. He said previously that it could take months for power to be restored across the island.
[In]  May, the island declared what amounts to the largest-ever U.S. municipal bankruptcy.
Two months later, the federal board voted to place Prepa, which has $9 billion of debt, in bankruptcy as well. The move was aimed at helping advance plans to modernize the utility and turn it from a government-owned monopoly into a regulated private utility.
Prepa’s problems have been decades in the making. Early in its history, it earned praise for powering Puerto Rico’s industrialization efforts in the 1940s and 1950s. But over time, it became less efficient, energy analysts say.
Its generating plants, which rely on imported oil for about 60% of their energy production, are mostly obsolete and require major upgrades or outright replacement... Power outages on the island are common. A fire at one of the utility’s plants in September triggered a blackout across the island that left many customers without power for days.
Yet prices are high. In April, Prepa’s average electricity rate for customers was 20.1 cents per kilowatt-hour, down from 25 cents in 2013 but still close to double the average mainland U.S. rate of about 12 cents, according to Moody’s.
For years, Prepa enjoyed easy access to bond markets and borrowed regularly, accumulating enormous debt. Yet it failed to make important capital investments, such as transitioning to natural gas from oil to generate power, analysts say. Analysts say the money went to a bloated payroll, among other things.[emphasis added]
When the island sank into recession, Prepa’s finances suffered even more, as business and residential demand for power declined. The exodus of Puerto Ricans to the continental U.S. is shrinking the island’s population, depleting the utility’s customer base. And austerity measures that the utility implemented as it headed toward bankruptcy resulted in cuts to the workforce it now needs to make repairs.
“All these things have compounded, one on top of the other,” Mr. Soto-Class said. They “will severely limit the ability of Prepa to come back quickly.”