I thought this new listing's price was a misprint, but no — they're serious

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73 Sawmill Lane, new construction, $3.849 million. In its defense, the swamp it sits in will afford shelter for peeper frogs, who will eat the mosquitos, and entertain you with their singing on hot summer nights. And with an exterior like this, this may be the only place left in town where you can leave the keys in your Range Rover with impunity — what thief would ever expect to find anything of value to steal here?

Bad lot, weak street, and a design that could only have come off the drawing board of a Yale Architectural School graduate; someone’s going to lose their shirt here. You $2.2 buyers, keep your checkbooks dry, and be ready to pounce in 2021.

At this price, you’d expect a bit more in foundation plantings than baby Brussels sprouts. And if I interpret the shadow correctly, that front door is protected by some sort of lattice work, affording no shelter from the elements. Sheesh — did I mention Yale?

At this price, you’d expect a bit more in foundation plantings than baby Brussels sprouts. And if I interpret the shadow correctly, that front door is protected by some sort of lattice work, affording no shelter from the elements. Sheesh — did I mention Yale?

swamp holler

swamp holler

here’s a mystery: the listing boasts of two fireplaces, but there’s nary a chimney to be seen, front or back: not even a sidewall vent for a gas feature. Virtual goggles provided?

here’s a mystery: the listing boasts of two fireplaces, but there’s nary a chimney to be seen, front or back: not even a sidewall vent for a gas feature. Virtual goggles provided?

No improvement in our Northeast Kingdom, alas

oops!

oops!

373 Taconic Road, which sold for $9.350 million in 2005, has been back up for sale since 2016, when it arrived on the market with a $9.750 price tag; it was reduced today to $5.999, and even with a nearly four-million-dollar price cut, I’m guessing it still has a ways to fall.

Exactly two years ago, when, after a year on the market, the price had been cut to $8.495, I discussed the house and its prospects, and predicted that it faced a hard slog before it found a buyer. That prediction may nor have been preternaturally prescient, but it was accurate enough for present purposes.

Our northeast corner has never commanded premium prices, so kudos to the agent who unloaded this 12,000 sq.ft. behemoth on her customer 14 years ago, * but there’s no happy ending here: not for this owner.

  • credit where credit’s due: Tamar Lurie sold her own listing; just yesterday I commented on her wicked sense of humor

Seems like a deal to me

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95 Stanwich Road (just around the corner from Central Middle) has come off rental and is back on the market at $2.495 million— it dropped today by $255,000. The house, built by a (very) good, local builder, sold new in 2004 for $3.450 million, and resold in 2007 (remember the crazy years? I’m so glad I wasn’t involved in that sale) for $3.890. That price may have been ill advised, but the house is very nice, the location great (Pomerance property is right next door, schools: elementary, middle and GHS all in walking distance [correction, elementary school for this address is North Street, not Cos Cob, so only the most intrepid third-graders will make that hike] and it’s just a dash and a few minutes to town and the railroad). The town appraises it at $3.4 +.

If you’re looking in this area, in this price range, I’d look at this one. The photos for this listing are simply awful, but don’t be put off — you really should see it for yourself, and then decide.

Price cut on Taconic

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282 Taconic, way up by Upper Cross Road, has dropped to $3.150 million. Owners paid $3.275 for it in 2004 and made enough improvements that they felt justified asking $3.895 when this saga began in 2015. Their optimism has proved unfounded.

This is one weird house, set on a long, narrow lot, much of it wetlands, and the outrageously out of scale pillars holding up an unnecessary appendage in front are, to my eye, simply absurd. That said, a friend of mine bought this back when it was new in 1995, and I’ll admit that it offers some great space for entertaining: easy flow, with plenty of room to accommodate guests.

My friend sold the place because, he said, round trips to Riverside, where he still had family ties, were 45-minute excursions, and he grew tired of them; playdates, forgotten teddy bears, it all grew old.

Personally, if I were looking for a place to throw parties, I’d rent a catering hall closer to town.

a cow skin on the floor means a stager at the door

a cow skin on the floor means a stager at the door

Nathaniel Witherell's medical director loses his license to prescribe opioids

new state-mandated poster at nathaniel witherell’s entrance

new state-mandated poster at nathaniel witherell’s entrance

Francis X. Walsh caught dishing out pain killers like candy to his private patients

Some years ago a friend from the Back Country told me there was a doctor in town who had a thriving practice supplying opioids to her peers. She wouldn’t tell me his name, so I don’t know whether this is the same guy, and he may very well not be; Greenwich residents have long enjoyed the services of a number of physicians who thrived by selling various mood-enhancing drugs to their patients. Back in the 60s, one particular doctor specialized in dosing females, whose stay-at-home lifestyle enabled them to visit during his daytime office hours. I do know the name of that doctor, but he departed from this earth long ago, so why sully his name now?

And besides, it’s not just MDs who pad their income in unconventional ways; dentists do it too, as this bit of doggerel reminds us:

There once was a dentist named Stone 
Who saw all his patients alone. 
In a fit of depravity 
He filled the wrong cavity, 
And my, how his practice has grown!

Well of course they do: America's going to Hell in a hand basket, rapidly

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Majority of Americans support our new socialist Congressman’s call for a 70% tax rate.

The majority of Americans also have no knowledge of economics, or history, and a huge percentage f them think that socialism will work here, despite its failure in every country that’s tried it.

This phenomenon can be attributed at least in part to the use of communist Howard Zinn’s “A History of the American People” as the standard history text in schools across the country, including Greenwich. Which, of course, was Zinn’s intention.

I despair for our future.

Price cut in the northern territory

Life in the 1930s seems to have been pretty glum. Perhaps the Depression influenced building styles.

Life in the 1930s seems to have been pretty glum. Perhaps the Depression influenced building styles.

15 Reynwood Manor (North Street, really, but with a fancy address), didn’t sell at $8.9 million from May, 2017 through its listing expiration in November. The owners switched agents and selected Tamar Lurie to represent them. She returned the house to the market at $9.250 million, a funny thing to do, raising the price when a house won’t sell, but Tamar’s always had a wicked sense of humor.

Today the price was dropped to $8.995, still $95,000 higher than the failed price of 2017. Tamar’s such card!

As an aside, if their’s a colder, cheerless house in Greenwicb, I haven’t seen it.

The man's a genius

hey! Over here! Squirrel!

hey! Over here! Squirrel!

CBS News’ head’s brother, Ben Rhodes, once boasted how easily he and his boss Obama turned the naive child reporters who cover Washington into “an echo chamber” so that the administration could whoop through the Iran nuclear deal. Hat tip to them, but The Donald managed to change the entire news cycle merely by serving fast food at the White House.

The press has gone crazy, digging up nutritionists who’ll condemn the very idea of offering 300-lb lineman a Big Mac and fries (the Clemson players loved them” and over at the Washington Post, their “fact checker” determined that Trump hadn’t really ordered 1,000 hamburgers —more like 300, according to the intrepid reporter — and, kid you not,, calculated that Trump’s claim that the hamburgers, stacked, wouldn’t actually build a tower “a mile high”. h

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No one expects reporters to investigate or write about the secret, deep-state conspiracy by the CIA and FBI to bring down a sitting president, but Trump at least distracted them from continuing their daily Russian collusion meme.

Easy as stealing candy from babies.

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UPDATE: Do you remember when the press savagely attacked Bill Clinton and, later, Obama, for eating at McDonalds? Neither do I. Clemson quarterback Trevor Lawrence, by the way, loved the food, and he wasn’t the only player to praise the President’s choice of what to serve

not a peep

not a peep