I've made this argument many many times before, but it bears repeating: learn a trade, make a living

 Who knew that specializing in post-modern African poetry wouldn't pay off?

Who knew that specializing in post-modern African poetry wouldn't pay off?

Apprentice electrician living the good life while college grads are living with their parents and pushing coffee at Starbucks.

A decade or so ago I sold a million-dollar home to a great guy from Byram who left GHS to attend Wright Technical School in Stamford, went on to be Mercedes of Greenwich's top mechanic and then moved up to Mercedes of Manhattan, where he oversaw 85 people. When he asked me to inquire at GHS whether Mercedes NY could donate their "obsolete" 3-year-old diagnostic computers to the tech-shop, we learned that the school had long since closed it.

Why our town thinks that training all our students to become cubicle-sharing corporate drones instead of helping some of them learn useful skills that will enable them to make a great living is beyond me.

As my friend/client told me, "I hated school, but I loved working on engines". There's not only nothing wrong with that, but if we encouraged it, a great number of our kids could be set on fulfilling, well-paid careers. It's the feminist dance theory majors from Vassar who are destined for the barista line, not our plumbers and electricians.