Oh, the humanity!

Trump proposes to restore Bill Clinton's work requirement for able-bodied food stamp recipients without dependents, and the Democrats howl.

That would be 20 hours a week either working, in job training, or doing community service.

Up in Maine, that other heartless bastard, Governor Lepage has already done this, and the caseload has dropped 80%.

In Maine, all ABAWDs [like the federal plan, that's "able-bodied adults without dependents" in the food stamp program are now required to take a job, participate in training, or perform community service.
Job openings for lower-skill workers are abundant in Maine, and for those ABAWD recipients who cannot find immediate employment, Maine offers both training and community service slots. In response to the new work requirement, however, most ABAWDs in Maine refused to participate in training or community service, despite vigorous outreach efforts by the government to encourage participation. When ABAWD recipients refused to participate, their food stamp benefits ceased.
In the first three months after Maine’s work policy went into effect, its ABAWD caseload plummeted by nearly 80 percent, falling from 13,332 recipients in December 2014 to 2,678 in March 2015.[5] This rapid drop in welfare dependence has a historical precedent: When work requirements were established in the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program under President Bill Clinton in the 1990s, nationwide caseloads dropped by a similar amount, albeit over a few years rather than a few months.

You may recall that one of Obama's early actions was abolishing Clinton's work requirement. From the first link above, this was the result:

Enrollments haven’t decreased much since the recession despite a low 4.5 percent unemployment rate.

The program cost about $33 billion in 2007 with 26 million enrollees. By 2013, costs peaked at nearly $80 billion with 47.6 million participants.

But despite the economic recovery, there were still about 44 million people getting benefits in 2016 at a cost of $71 billion.

On average, each enrollee gets $125.50 a month.

Up in Maine, more than half the food stamp recipients smoke, at an average cost of $111 per month (and spend far more than that on drugs and alcohol).

And I'm delighted to force millions of Americans to pay for my compassion.(And of course, the workfare requirements don't apply to recipients with dependent children, but never mind)

And I'm delighted to force millions of Americans to pay for my compassion.(And of course, the workfare requirements don't apply to recipients with dependent children, but never mind)