Old homes continue to unimpress

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5 Knollwood Drive, asking $2.650 million, has found a buyer after almost a year on the market. It's a beautiful, 1926 home, updated and close to town, but its slow sales history points out, to me at least, where the market's trending.

It sold for $2.850 million in 2007; that buyer renovated it, put it back on the market for $3.995,and finally sold it to these owners for $2.730 in 2014. And now they're taking a hit, too.

Nothing at all wrong with this house, to my taste, but the market seems to differ. Active buyers might want to look at older homes, because they're apparently going at a discount compared to their more modern competition. Just as "brown furniture" pieces — hand made, gorgeous antiques —  are currently a drag on the market, vintage homes also offer a comparative bargain. Tastes change, and prices for antiques and classics may recover. If not, at least you'll have enjoyed them during your ownership.

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 Why the agent failed to go full-zebra puzzles me, though. the cow never works (even with an extension cord beneath it)

Why the agent failed to go full-zebra puzzles me, though. the cow never works (even with an extension cord beneath it)